Can this tech company survive long enough to cash in on 130 million potential Chinese customers?



7 of 9 Star Trek Voyager

If you are a Star Trek fan, then you'll probably understand Netlinkz (ASX:NET) technology faster than most.

In the iconic series Star Trek, the Borg can all communicate at once, they can self repair, or, if one can't be repaired, the nearest Borg takes over.

As an old Trekkie, it is hard to not draw a comparison between the Borg and Netlinkz's proprietary 'virtual network' software.

Netlinkz software can create a virtual communication network, over the top any public or private network, including the Internet.

This 'virtual network' only exists for the time of communication, whether a text, a file-send or a raw data exchange.

From the users point of view the connection happens automatically but unlike a traditional network, using an always-on router, the Netlinkz on-off solution, makes it virtually impossible to hack.

A hacker would have to catch the transmission in action before they could start to try and interfere with it.


Also, if one device becomes unstable, the software simply looks for the next nearest stable device in the network to maintain the network.

More on how it works in the interview.

As a company, Netlinkz has been through a turbulent time over the past couple of years, but according to current CEO James Tsiolis:

  • Company focus shifted from product development to sales

  • Operating costs cut dramatically

  • Recurring revenue licencing agreement with China's third largest telco, China Telecom now in place.

China Telecom is experiencing rapid growth and according to China Internet Watch has 131 million broadband customers.

We caught up with James Tsiolis to better understand the strengths and weaknesses of the company and, whether it can turn that potential, into commercial success.


We do not recommend or advise to buy or sell NET shares. The InsideMarket Private Fund does not own shares in Netlinkz, and we have not received any payment from the company for this coverage. Such shares should be considered very speculative, high-risk, and very volatile. There are significant risks inherent in developing new technologies that are not discussed here. You should always seek professional advice before considering any share purchase or sale. Please read our full disclaimer here. The InsideMarket Private Fund does not own shares in Netlinkz, and we have not received any payment from the company for this coverage.


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